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Dramatic tail view video of an Emirates A380 landing during a storm

Emirates A380

AirlineRatings.com captured a dramatic tail view video of an Emirates A380 landing during a storm at Perth International Airport in 2019.

It is your most popular video so we are showing you it again.

The landing was on Friday, July 19, 2019, at 6 pm while a major cold front was passing through.

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The Swiss captain did a superb job of pointing the nose of the A380 into the direction of the wind which can be clearly seen in the video taken on a handheld iPhone of the aircraft’s entertainment system.

Also on show is Perth Airport’s $36 million high-intensity lighting system which clearly outlines the approach and runway.

That landing system is a CAT111B which is normally used for landings in fog, but the high-intensity lighting is also used on stormy nights.

Where a pilot faces a crosswind landing they need to point the aircraft in the direction of the wind while maintaining a straight course toward the runway.

This is called crabbing or yawing.

In strong crosswinds, the pilot may also dip the wing – sideslip – into the direction of the wind.

Just before touchdown pilots apply rudder to bring the plane – and its undercarriage – back so it is aligned straight down the centre line of the runway.

Here it can be seen that the captain of the A380 straightens up just before touch down for a perfect landing.

At the time the winds were reported as gusting up to 40kts (74km/hour) from the west/south/west.

Cockpit View Of A Boeing 777 Landing In Driving Rain

Boeing 777

We have a stunning video of landing in driving rain from the cockpit of a Boeing 777.

The Boeing 777 is one of Boeing’s most successful jets and the backbone of the world’s global long-haul fleet.

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About AirlineRatings.com

Airlineratings.com was developed to provide everyone in the world a one-stop shop for everything related to airlines, formed by a team of aviation editors, who have forensically researched nearly every airline in the world.

Our rating system is rated from one to seven stars on safety – with seven being the highest ranking. Within each airline, you will find the country of origin, airline code, booking URL and seat map information. The rating system takes into account a number of different factors related to audits from aviation’s governing bodies, lead associations, as well as the airlines, own safety data. Every airline has a safety rating breakdown so you can see exactly how they rate.

Over 230 of the airlines on the site that carry 99 per cent of the world’s passengers have a product rating. Given that low-cost, regional and full-service carriers are so different we have constructed a different rating system for each which can be found within each airline.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

Korean Air Adds More Routes To China, Japan and Israel.

Korean Air
A Korean Air Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner. Photo: Korean Air.

Korean Air will soon resume operations on more routes to China, Japan and Israel after a long COVID hiatus.

Korean Air will resume services to Shanghai, Nanjing and Qingdao in China; Sapporo and Okinawa in Japan; and Tel Aviv, Israel. 

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Video of stunning supersonic flyovers

MH370: New research paper confirms revolutionary location technology

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Starting from November 20, the airline will operate flights once a week on its Shanghai route on Sundays. The flights depart from Incheon at 8:30 am and arrive at Shanghai Pudong at 9:55 am. The return flights depart from Shanghai at 1:05 pm and arrive in Incheon at 4:10 pm.

Flights on the Incheon-Nanjing route will resume once a week on Wednesdays from December 7. Flights depart from Seoul at 9:00 am to arrive in Nanjing at 10:30 am. The return flights depart Nanjing at 1:15 pm and arrive in Seoul at 4:55 pm.

Starting December 11, the airline will resume services on the Incheon-Qingdao route, to operate once weekly on Sundays. The flight departs from Incheon at 9:05 am and arrives in Qingdao at 9:45 am. The return flight departs from Qingdao at 10:55 pm to arrive in Incheon at 1:25 pm.

The airline has resumed operations on the Incheon-Dalian route once a week on Fridays starting on October 28, and has increased its frequency on Incheon-Shenyang and Incheon-Tianjin routes from once a week to twice a week, operating on Tuesdays/Fridays and Tuesdays/Saturdays, respectively. 

Korean Air will resume services on some of its major Japanese routes in line with the travel demand recovery following the resumption of the country’s visa waiver program. Daily flights to Sapporo Chitose will resume on December 1, departing from Incheon at 10:05 am and arriving in Sapporo at 12:45 pm. The returning flights depart from Sapporo at 2:00 pm and arrive in Incheon at 5:15 pm.

Flights to Okinawa will resume on December 1, and will operate four times a week on Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays, and Sundays, departing from Incheon at 8:05 am and arriving in Okinawa at 10:25 am. The returning flights depart from Okinawa at 11:35 pm and arrive in Incheon at 1:55 pm.

Flights to Tel Aviv will resume on December 26, and will operate three times a week on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, departing from Incheon at 2:35 pm and arriving in Tel Aviv at 8 pm. The returning flights depart from Tel Aviv at 9:55 pm and arrive in Incheon at 3:10 pm on the following day.

Another Blow To Boeing 737 MAX 7 Certification

737 MAX

In what is another major blow to the certifications of the Boeing 737 MAX 7 the U.S. government watchdog will evaluate the Federal Aviation Administration’s oversight of the aircraft program.

The Transportation Department’s Office of Inspector General will audit the FAA’s oversight of the inclusion of MCAS software, which has previously been alleged to be a factor in two deadly MAX crashes in 2018 and 2019, according to a memo from the OIG.

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Video of stunning supersonic flyovers

MH370: New research paper confirms revolutionary location technology

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Seeking Alpha says that the OIG plans to start its audit later this month, according to the memo.

The website said that “last month the WSJ reported that U.S. flight-safety officials asked Boeing to review its safety documents for the 737 MAX 7 in another possible obstacle to receiving approval for the airplane before a federal deadline expires this year.”

This is an extract from the memo:

“In light of these events, the Chairmen of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and its Subcommittee on Aviation requested that we evaluate FAA’s oversight activities related to the Boeing 737 MAX AOA disagree alert and the inclusion of MCAS in the original design. This request builds on two of our previous reports and one ongoing project about the 737 MAX.
Accordingly, we are initiating an audit of FAA’s oversight activities of two targeted elements of the Boeing 737 MAX: (1) the inoperability of the AOA disagree alert on the majority of the MAX fleet in 2019 and (2) the inclusion of MCAS as part of the speed trim in the 737 MAX design. Specifically, we will evaluate FAA’s compliance with applicable statutes, regulations, and policies in overseeing Boeing actions concerning the two areas.
We plan to begin the audit later this month and will contact your audit liaison to schedule an entrance conference. We will conduct our work at FAA Headquarters and the FAA regional office in Seattle, WA. If you have any questions, please contact me or Marshall Jackson, Program Director.”

Magnificent Video Of An Emirates A380 At Sunset

Emirates

We have a magnificent clip of an Emirates A380 taxiing out for take-off at sunset in Melbourne Australia.

Emirates has the world’s largest fleet of A380s.

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Video of stunning supersonic flyovers

MH370: New research paper confirms revolutionary location technology

Ten greatest cabin innovations this century

About AirlineRatings.com

Airlineratings.com was developed to provide everyone in the world a one-stop shop for everything related to airlines, formed by a team of aviation editors, who have forensically researched nearly every airline in the world.

Our rating system is rated from one to seven stars on safety – with seven being the highest ranking. Within each airline, you will find the country of origin, airline code, booking URL and seat map information. The rating system takes into account a number of different factors related to audits from aviation’s governing bodies, lead associations, as well as the airlines, own safety data. Every airline has a safety rating breakdown so you can see exactly how they rate.

Over 230 of the airlines on the site that carry 99 per cent of the world’s passengers have a product rating. Given that low-cost, regional and full-service carriers are so different we have constructed a different rating system for each which can be found within each airline.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

Best of all, there are simple answers to many of the quirky questions including:

  • “What are all those noises after takeoff and before landing?”
  • “Why do you have to put the window shades up for landing and takeoff?”
  • “What is a winglet and what is it for?
  • “Why is it so costly to fly short distances?”
  • “How often is an aircraft maintained?
  • “How strong is a wing?”
  • “How do they test aircraft”
  • “How often do plane tyres need to be replaced?”

Incredible Wave Goodbye From A Boeing 747

Boeing 747

We have an incredible video of the crew of a Cargolux Boeing 747 freighter taking off from the Boeing plant in Everett where she was built and waving the wings in a goodbye.

The actual model is a Boeing 747 -8F.

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The world’s biggest plane, the AN-225 to be rebuilt

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About AirlineRatings.com

Airlineratings.com was developed to provide everyone in the world a one-stop shop for everything related to airlines, formed by a team of aviation editors, who have forensically researched nearly every airline in the world.

Our rating system is rated from one to seven stars on safety – with seven being the highest ranking. Within each airline, you will find the country of origin, airline code, booking URL and seat map information. The rating system takes into account a number of different factors related to audits from aviation’s governing bodies, lead associations, as well as the airlines, own safety data. Every airline has a safety rating breakdown so you can see exactly how they rate.

Over 230 of the airlines on the site that carry 99 per cent of the world’s passengers have a product rating. Given that low-cost, regional and full-service carriers are so different we have constructed a different rating system for each which can be found within each airline.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

Best of all, there are simple answers to many of the quirky questions including:

  • “What are all those noises after takeoff and before landing?”
  • “Why do you have to put the window shades up for landing and takeoff?”
  • “What is a winglet and what is it for?
  • “Why is it so costly to fly short distances?”
  • “How often is an aircraft maintained?
  • “How strong is a wing?”
  • “How do they test aircraft”
  • “How often do plane tyres need to be replaced?”

Frenchman Brings Colour To Classic Douglas Propliners

Douglas

Frenchman Benoit Vienne has once again shown his amazing colourisation skills to bring to life some classic Douglas propliners of the 1950s in glorious colour.

In his latest efforts, the 24-year-old has worked on the classic DC-6 and DC-7, propliners which dominated the late 1940s, and 1950s.

Subscribe to the Airlineratings.com newsletter to get the relevant news first

Video of stunning supersonic flyovers

MH370: New research paper confirms revolutionary location technology

Ten greatest cabin innovations this century

For Mr Vienne colourisation is a passion that started years ago when playing historical video games. That passion was ignited when he discovered colourised photos on the internet.

“I was so impressed by the feeling a colourised photo can bring.

“A lot of young people feel a bit disconnected when they see a black and white photo but when it’s colourised, the feeling is completely different.

“When you see a colourised photo, you feel close to the people. You connect.”

But it is far from a simple process taking hours of meticulous work.

“Colorizing a black and white photo can take a lot of time and sometimes you have to repair it first, says Mr Vienne.

“The aim of the colourist is to bring back to life a moment that was captured through a photo. When you colourise, you bring back people to life, it’s a sort of second life for them.”

“Of course, most of the colourists (including myself) are trying to respect the colours of the past. When you are colourizing a photo of a soldier or an aviator, you have to respect the colours of the time.“

TEAL – the forerunner to Air New Zealand DC-6 at Christchurch.

But first Mr Vienne had to master photoshop – an art in itself.

“I started to colourise in early 2015 but it was really hard to use photoshop because it was the first time that I was using the program.“

But months of practice had paid big dividends with Mr. Vienne colourising hundreds of military photos of British, French American, and German soldiers as well as civilian portraits and weddings.

For AirlineRatings.com Mr Vienne has colourised hundreds of airline interior and aircraft pictures that have proved very popular with the website’s millions of followers.

Mr Vienne has done work for Qantas and Boeing as well.

Many of the Boeing and McDonnell Douglas colourised images have also been donated back to Boeing’s Historical Archives.

Boeing 777 Blows Semi-Trailer Truck Over

Boeing 777

We have a video of the Boeing 777 doing test engine runs and blowing over a huge semi-trailer truck.

The Boeing 777 belongs to Jet Airways.

Subscribe to the Airlineratings.com newsletter to get the relevant news first

The world’s biggest plane, the AN-225 to be rebuilt

Tragic mid-air crash at Dallas airshow

Ten greatest cabin innovations this century

About AirlineRatings.com

Airlineratings.com was developed to provide everyone in the world a one-stop shop for everything related to airlines, formed by a team of aviation editors, who have forensically researched nearly every airline in the world.

Our rating system is rated from one to seven stars on safety – with seven being the highest ranking. Within each airline, you will find the country of origin, airline code, booking URL and seat map information. The rating system takes into account a number of different factors related to audits from aviation’s governing bodies, lead associations, as well as the airlines, own safety data. Every airline has a safety rating breakdown so you can see exactly how they rate.

Over 230 of the airlines on the site that carry 99 per cent of the world’s passengers have a product rating. Given that low-cost, regional and full-service carriers are so different we have constructed a different rating system for each which can be found within each airline.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

Best of all, there are simple answers to many of the quirky questions including:

  • “What are all those noises after takeoff and before landing?”
  • “Why do you have to put the window shades up for landing and takeoff?”
  • “What is a winglet and what is it for?
  • “Why is it so costly to fly short distances?”
  • “How often is an aircraft maintained?
  • “How strong is a wing?”
  • “How do they test aircraft”
  • “How often do plane tyres need to be replaced?”

Pilot Battles Crosswinds In Beijing To Land A Business Jet

Boeing 787

We have a great video of a pilot battling crosswinds in Beijing to land a Global Business Jet.

Subscribe to the Airlineratings.com newsletter to get the relevant news first

Video of stunning supersonic flyovers

MH370: New research paper confirms revolutionary location technology

Ten greatest cabin innovations this century

About AirlineRatings.com

Airlineratings.com was developed to provide everyone in the world a one-stop shop for everything related to airlines, formed by a team of aviation editors, who have forensically researched nearly every airline in the world.

Our rating system is rated from one to seven stars on safety – with seven being the highest ranking. Within each airline, you will find the country of origin, airline code, booking URL and seat map information. The rating system takes into account a number of different factors related to audits from aviation’s governing bodies, lead associations, as well as the airlines, own safety data. Every airline has a safety rating breakdown so you can see exactly how they rate.

Over 230 of the airlines on the site that carry 99 per cent of the world’s passengers have a product rating. Given that low-cost, regional and full-service carriers are so different we have constructed a different rating system for each which can be found within each airline.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

Best of all, there are simple answers to many of the quirky questions including:

  • “What are all those noises after takeoff and before landing?”
  • “Why do you have to put the window shades up for landing and takeoff?”
  • “What is a winglet and what is it for?
  • “Why is it so costly to fly short distances?”
  • “How often is an aircraft maintained?
  • “How strong is a wing?”
  • “How do they test aircraft”
  • “How often do plane tyres need to be replaced?”

Chasing The Sun Across The Pacific

Chasing the sun

Loub747 has captured two jets chasing the sun across the Pacific Ocean at sunset with vapour trails streaming from the engines.

Subscribe to the Airlineratings.com newsletter to get the relevant news first

Video of stunning supersonic flyovers

MH370: New research paper confirms revolutionary location technology

Ten greatest cabin innovations this century

About AirlineRatings.com

Airlineratings.com was developed to provide everyone in the world a one-stop shop for everything related to airlines, formed by a team of aviation editors, who have forensically researched nearly every airline in the world.

Our rating system is rated from one to seven stars on safety – with seven being the highest ranking. Within each airline, you will find the country of origin, airline code, booking URL and seat map information. The rating system takes into account a number of different factors related to audits from aviation’s governing bodies, lead associations, as well as the airlines, own safety data. Every airline has a safety rating breakdown so you can see exactly how they rate.

Over 230 of the airlines on the site that carry 99 per cent of the world’s passengers have a product rating. Given that low-cost, regional and full-service carriers are so different we have constructed a different rating system for each which can be found within each airline.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

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