Saturday, January 28, 2023
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Air NZ Working Through Major Flood Disruptions

Air NZ
Auckland Airport. Credit Telegraph You Tube

Air NZ is working through major disruptions to its operations caused by extraordinary flooding in Auckland.

Air NZ Chief Operational Integrity and Safety Officer, Captain David Morgan said that “following the heavy rain, flooding and closure of Auckland Domestic and International terminals, Air New Zealand is working through significant flight disruptions on its network.

“As Auckland is the hub of its operation, the airline is working through what its schedule will look like from midday today when Auckland Airport is scheduled to reopen.

“Overnight the airline saw 12 international services due into Auckland divert to other ports. This will cause significant flow-on effects while the airline works through getting customers on those services to their original destinations and our crew and planes back where they need to be. This may take a few days to recover.

“The airline is advising those with non-urgent travel between now and Monday 30th January 2023 to make use of the flexibility policy. Customers can either hold their fare in credit or rebook in the same class of travel between Saturday 28th January 2023 and Monday 6th February 2023 without fare difference, penalty or service fees.”

The airline said that customers can easily opt into credit via the Air New Zealand app or website in the Manage Booking tab, by selecting request a credit. They can also use the app or website to change their flights to another date and have their change fee waived, though a fare difference may apply.

Advice for customers booked to travel:

  • The Air New Zealand app is the easiest way for customers to stay up to date with flight details and changes
  • Most customers are able to self-serve via the Manage Booking tab on the Air New Zealand website
  • Impacted customers will be notified and rebooked to the next best alternative over the next 48 hours
  • As the contact centre is experiencing extremely high volumes of calls we ask that only those with travel over the next 24 hours contact us directly.
  • The airline’s travel alerts page has the most up-to-date information on operating flights – our contact centre team do not have any more information than this
  • If you are travelling out of Auckland, please do not travel to the airport until you receive an update that your flight is going ahead

Customers who booked through a travel agent or third-party online agent should contact them directly about making changes to their bookings or credit validity.

Air New Zealand said it would like to thank customers for their patience and support while it works through these significant disruptions.

Bonza Flights On Sale From A$49

Bonza

Bonza, the new low-fare Australian airline has flights on sale to 12 destinations on 15 routes from $49. 

Aussie travellers need to book on the Fly Bonza app to get the lowest fares and to score a seat on the airline’s first flights, starting with Sunshine Coast to Whitsunday Coast on Tuesday January 31.

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Bookings are opening for flights up to late October 2023. 

Bonza Chief Commercial Officer Carly Povey said “the wait is over! 2023 is the Year for Allstralia (Australia) with low-cost air travel to many holiday spots, some of which are relatively undiscovered. It’s time to see more of your own backyard for less.

“We’re delighted to be delivering on our commitment to make air travel more accessible. We promised choice and better connectivity to the regions for less and we’ve been beyond delighted with the support for our mission. 

“Today we start making travel a possibility for the many, not the few. Forget connecting flights or your bum going numb in the car, Bonza is here to take Aussies from A to B without the C (cost and complexity)”.

Bonza says that travellers who have already downloaded the app, should delete and reinstall the latest version to have the ability to book flights.

Some of the one-way fares from the Sunshine Coast are:

Albury A$69, Avalon A$79, Carins A$79, Rockhampton A$49 and Whitsunday Coast A$59.

“It’s important that Aussie travellers know we’re on sale, not having a sale. We’re committed to low cost fares which will in turn, stimulate new markets for Australia’s domestic tourism industry. We’re confident whenever customers choose to travel, all our fares and not just our starting fares will represent great value,” added Povey. 

Routes from Bonza’s second base at Melbourne Airport are expected to go on sale in a matter of weeks.

More Omissions In Ethiopian 737 MAX Report

737 MAX

The US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has released additional comments on the Ethiopian Aircraft Accident Investigation Bureau’s (EAIB) final report of the March 10, 2019, crash of Ethiopian Airlines flight 302, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft. 

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The NTSB said that the new comments, provided to the EAIB’s investigator-in-charge, detail its concerns about several of the findings in the final accident report. This is in addition to the previous comments on the EAIB’s final accident report, which detailed the investigation’s insufficient attention to the human performance aspects of the accident. 

The NTSB said:

“The EAIB issued its final report without giving the NTSB the opportunity to review new information incorporated since the NTSB’s last review and provide comments ahead of the report’s issuance, as stipulated by the International Civil Aviation Organization’s Annex 13. 

“Although the NTSB agrees with the overall finding in the EAIB report related to the role the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) and related systems played in the accident, the EAIB’s report contains findings the NTSB said are unsupported by evidence — for example, that aircraft electrical problems caused erroneous angle-of-attack (AOA) output. 

“In its final report, the EAIB wrote electrical anomalies that existed since the time of the accident airplane’s production caused the AOA sensor heater to fail, which resulted in the AOA sensor providing erroneous values that caused MCAS to repeatedly pitch the nose of the airplane downward until it struck the ground.

“But the NTSB found the erroneous AOA sensor output was caused by the separation of the AOA sensor vane due to impact with a foreign object, which was most likely a bird. During the accident investigation, the NTSB provided the EAIB with evidence supporting this finding, but that evidence was not included in the final report. 

“The NTSB also said the EAIB’s finding about the lack of MCAS documentation for flight crews was misleading since Boeing had provided the information to all 737 MAX operators four months before the Ethiopian Airlines crash.”

The French BEA has also criticised the Ethiopian crash investigation.

The complete text of the NTSB’s comments is available online.

New Detailed Analysis Confirms MH370 Debris

MH370

British Aerospace engineer Richard Godfrey has completed an analysis that confirms that the latest debris found is almost certainly from MH370.

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In December last year, wreck hunter Blaine Gibson was taken to a new piece of MH370 debris which was identified as part of the undercarriage door system.

However, some disputed this and said it was from a yacht.

Now Mr Godfrey, who has led the revolutionary new tracking of M370 with WSPRnet technology, has completed a detailed analysis of the debris found in Madagascar and says it is from a “from Boeing aircraft and cannot be from marine provenance.”

Mr Godfrey says “the key difference is the lightning protection system used on Boeing aircraft with composite materials, which is fundamentally different to the lightning protection system used in marine applications with composite materials. Boeing components made with composite materials which are exposed to lightning strikes incorporate a layer of MicroGrid wire mesh manufactured by Dexmet Corporation. This is the case in the latest item of debris found in Madagascar.”

Mr Godfrey adds that “a significant proportion of the airplane structure of a Boeing 777 is made of composite materials to reduce weight and improve resistance to corrosion. Composite materials are layers (or plies) of high-strength fibres (carbon fibre or fibreglass) in a mixture of plastic resin. Aircraft components made of composite materials use laminations or combine layers of the composite materials with a honeycomb core to form a sandwich construction.

“The recent debris item has an aluminium wire mesh embedded in the composite material between the black surface and the honeycomb core. The first photo (below) shows an exposed area of honeycomb core, but underneath an aluminium wire mesh layer embedded in the epoxy resin of the next composite material layer.

The honeycomb structure being non-metallic requires a lightning protection system and the Dexmet MicroGrid layer can be seen in the close-up picture (under) in the layer below the honeycomb core.

“This proves that the latest debris item is an exterior panel from an aircraft in a lightning-exposed location and not an interior panel such as a cabin divider.

“The location of where the piece of debris was found in Antsiraka Beach in Madagascar, where a total of 20 items of floating debris from MH370 have been found in Madagascar and 4 on the same Antsiraka Beach, confirms the likelihood that this new item of floating debris is also from MH370. Out of the items washed ashore in Madagascar and officially analysed, 6 items have been determined to be almost certain, highly likely or likely from MH370 by the authorities.

“Considering that MH370 (aircraft registered as 9M-MRO) ended its flight in the South Indian Ocean, the location of this recent find is consistent with the drift path modelling produced by the University of Western Australia (UWA) and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). This suggests that the part is likely from MH370 given that the likelihood of it originating from another source is quite remote.”

Flying London-Sydney With A Baby On Emirates

emirates

We join Tom and Alice and their gorgeous baby, flight-testing Emirates on the longest air route in the world – London to Sydney.

Tom and Alice were taking the baby on Emirates to meet grandmother Lesley.

All round it’s thumbs up from Tom and Alice to “all the wonderful Emirates staff.”

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About AirlineRatings.com
Airlineratings.com was developed to provide everyone in the world a one-stop shop for everything related to airlines, formed by a team of aviation editors, who have forensically researched nearly every airline in the world.

Our rating system is rated from one to seven stars on safety – with seven being the highest ranking. Within each airline, you will find the country of origin, airline code, booking URL and seat map information. The rating system takes into account a number of different factors related to audits from aviation’s governing bodies, lead associations, as well as the airlines, own safety data. Every airline has a safety rating breakdown so you can see exactly how they rate.

Over 230 of the airlines on the site that carry 99 per cent of the world’s passengers have a product rating. Given that low-cost, regional and full-service carriers are so different we have constructed a different rating system for each which can be found within each airline.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

Best of all, there are simple answers to many of the quirky questions including:

“What are all those noises after takeoff and before landing?”
“Why do you have to put the window shades up for landing and takeoff?”
“What is a winglet and what is it for?
“Why is it so costly to fly short distances?”
“How often is an aircraft maintained?
“How strong is a wing?”
“How do they test aircraft”
“How often do plane tyres need to be replaced?

Short Runway and Crazy Winds in New Zealand

new zealand

We join Sam Chui in New Zealand flying from Auckland to Queenstown and then to Wellington taking in the country’s most challenging and windy airports.

New Zealand is a country of stunning beauty and amazing airports.

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About AirlineRatings.com
Airlineratings.com was developed to provide everyone in the world a one-stop shop for everything related to airlines, formed by a team of aviation editors, who have forensically researched nearly every airline in the world.

Our rating system is rated from one to seven stars on safety – with seven being the highest ranking. Within each airline, you will find the country of origin, airline code, booking URL and seat map information. The rating system takes into account a number of different factors related to audits from aviation’s governing bodies, lead associations, as well as the airlines, own safety data. Every airline has a safety rating breakdown so you can see exactly how they rate.

Over 230 of the airlines on the site that carry 99 per cent of the world’s passengers have a product rating. Given that low-cost, regional and full-service carriers are so different we have constructed a different rating system for each which can be found within each airline.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

Best of all, there are simple answers to many of the quirky questions including:

“What are all those noises after takeoff and before landing?”
“Why do you have to put the window shades up for landing and takeoff?”
“What is a winglet and what is it for?
“Why is it so costly to fly short distances?”
“How often is an aircraft maintained?
“How strong is a wing?”
“How do they test aircraft”
“How often do plane tyres need to be replaced?

Grand Canyon At Sunset From A Boeing 747

Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon at Sunset is at its most beautiful and has been captured by Boeing 747 Captain Christiaan van Heijst.

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Christiaan van Heijst takes up the story;

“A breathtaking area defined by steep-angled canyons that formed over the course of millions of years as the Colorado river cut its way through the landscape, revealing sedimentary layers that were built up during billions of years.

“A trip down to geological history within a glance.

“Seen here while flying 37,000 ft above, it is also one of the few natural spectacles that is visible from the International Space Station. A charismatic scar on the face of the Earth, if there ever was one.

“It’s been a while since I’ve seen it from the ground. Thirty-five years to be precise: with my parents on a weekend trip from Phoenix during winter when I was just four years old. I still have some memories of that time, remembering the beautiful snow-covered mountains intermixing with so many hues of orange and red from the canyons below.

“I can’t wait to go back and explore Arizona once more.”

Christiaan is one of the world’s leading aviation photographers and more of his work and close encounter (s) can be found here.

You can follow Christiaan on Instagram here: @jpcvanheijst

About AirlineRatings.com
Airlineratings.com was developed to provide everyone in the world a one-stop shop for everything related to airlines, formed by a team of aviation editors, who have forensically researched nearly every airline in the world.

Our rating system is rated from one to seven stars on safety – with seven being the highest ranking. Within each airline, you will find the country of origin, airline code, booking URL and seat map information. The rating system takes into account a number of different factors related to audits from aviation’s governing bodies, lead associations, as well as the airlines, own safety data. Every airline has a safety rating breakdown so you can see exactly how they rate.

Over 230 of the airlines on the site that carry 99 per cent of the world’s passengers have a product rating. Given that low-cost, regional and full-service carriers are so different we have constructed a different rating system for each which can be found within each airline.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

Best of all, there are simple answers to many of the quirky questions including:

“What are all those noises after takeoff and before landing?”
“Why do you have to put the window shades up for landing and takeoff?”
“What is a winglet and what is it for?
“Why is it so costly to fly short distances?”
“How often is an aircraft maintained?
“How strong is a wing?”
“How do they test aircraft”
“How often do plane tyres need to be replaced?

MH370 Tracking Meeting “A Great Success”

MH370
9M-MRO at Perth Airport in 2012. Credit: Alan Pepper

British Aerospace engineer Richard Godfrey, who is leading the tracking for MH370 has held a very successful meeting to discuss the progress of the WSPR technology which has pinpointed the most likely crash site for MH370.

It is highly likely that this work will be the basis of the next search.

Mr Godfrey has published this map (under) of the MH370 location based on his WSPR technology and you can read the full report here and you can read his latest tracking meeting update below.

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Mr Godfrey posted to his website the following detail.

“The meeting on WSPR technology was a great success. There were a significant number of participants from all over the globe and from various time zones. Some participants had 2 feet of new snow outside their window, others were sweltering at 34°C (93°F) and high humidity. With multiple presenters (Prof. Simon Maskell, Dr Hannes Coetzee, Dominik Bugmann and myself), the Google Meet technology was stretched to the limit. Internet connections generally held up globally, with one short exception.

“Dr Robert Westphal and his collaborator Dr Karl Herrmann were not able to attend, but their early pioneer work and ongoing research are held in high honour, despite the strong opposing winds that caused them to retreat from public life. Rob is the father of the idea to use WSPR to track MH370.

“There is definitely a momentum building in using WSPR to detect and track aircraft and in using WSPR to help identify the crash location of MH370. I personally found the meeting very encouraging. The meeting overran, as there was such great interest in our work evidenced by a large number of very good and perceptive questions being asked and answered. In hindsight, we should have recorded the meeting.

“Prof. Simon Maskell observed: “I thought it was particularly reassuring that the questions that we can’t answer easily are precisely those that we are working towards generating compelling answers for.” It was also clear, that it is perfectly acceptable in scientific circles to say, that we don’t know the full answer to that question yet, but we also have the same question and are working on the answer, and we will let you know our findings in due course.

“Dr. Hannes Coetzee outlined the major differences between classical radar and WSPR technology. A typical airport radar has a pulse width of 1 µs and the energy illuminating any object is small despite the transmission power of 1.1 MW and pulse rate between 300 and 1,200 pulses per second. WSPR has a coherent integration time of 110.6 seconds and a transmission power of typically 1 W, resulting in a similar order of magnitude of energy illuminating the target aircraft. Hannes also pointed out the WSPR processing removes short and medium-term ionospheric fluctuations.

“Dominik Bugmann showed how WSPR signals from his radio shack in Switzerland can be received in Australia with the WSPR protocol confirming receipt of the signal and how the receiving station software determined the signal-to-noise ratio and frequency drift deviations. He also demonstrated how the interim landing points of a multiple-hop ionospheric propagation aligned with the target aircraft position and the great circle paths of multiple intersecting anomalous WSPR links.

“The participants thanked us for the great work and the obvious thousands of hours invested in WSPR technology and using that to help solve the mystery of MH370. It was once again evident to all participants that the combination of Inmarsat satellite data, Boeing aircraft performance data, 39 items of likely or confirmed MH370 floating debris, the UWA drift analysis data and our work using WSPR technology all point to the same crash location around 30°S to 32°S.

“It was equally clear that the MH370 crash location could be just outside of the previously searched areas in this latitude range. However, the absence of the IFE connection expected at around 00:21:06 UTC (approximately 90 seconds after 00:19:37 UTC) as well as the analysis of the BFO data by Ian Holland of the DSTG, which shows an accelerating rate of descent of between 14,800 fpm and 25,300 fpm at 00:19:37 UTC, may well both separately set a limit to the maximum possible distance of the crash location from the 7th Arc. In summary, this information narrows the area for any future underwater search for MH370 and increases the probability of finding the main wreckage of MH370.”

Spectacular United Airlines Photoshoot

United Airlines

United Airlines has posted a great video of a team taking videos and photos of its brand-new Boeing 737 MAX jet.

United Airlines was a launch customer of the Boeing 737 and has ordered

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About AirlineRatings.com
Airlineratings.com was developed to provide everyone in the world a one-stop shop for everything related to airlines, formed by a team of aviation editors, who have forensically researched nearly every airline in the world.

Our rating system is rated from one to seven stars on safety – with seven being the highest ranking. Within each airline, you will find the country of origin, airline code, booking URL and seat map information. The rating system takes into account a number of different factors related to audits from aviation’s governing bodies, lead associations, as well as the airlines, own safety data. Every airline has a safety rating breakdown so you can see exactly how they rate.

Over 230 of the airlines on the site that carry 99 per cent of the world’s passengers have a product rating. Given that low-cost, regional and full-service carriers are so different we have constructed a different rating system for each which can be found within each airline.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

Best of all, there are simple answers to many of the quirky questions including:

“What are all those noises after takeoff and before landing?”
“Why do you have to put the window shades up for landing and takeoff?”
“What is a winglet and what is it for?
“Why is it so costly to fly short distances?”
“How often is an aircraft maintained?
“How strong is a wing?”
“How do they test aircraft”
“How often do plane tyres need to be replaced?

Air India To Order 495 Aircraft On Jan 27

Air India
Air india 787

Reuters is reporting that Air India will place an order for 495 aircraft from Airbus and Boeing on Friday, January 27.

The news agency quoted industry sources said that Airbus “is set to win an order for 235 single-aisle planes as part of a historic purchase of some 495 jets” from Air India.

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It adds that “the deal, roughly split with rival Boeing, covers a total of 425 single-aisle jets including 235 Airbus A320neo-family planes as well as 190 Boeing 737 MAX airliners as well as up to 70 widebody long-haul aircraft including up to 40 Airbus A350s as well as some 20 Boeing 787s and 10 Boeing 777X.”

The deal will come one year to the day since the giant Tata Group purchased Air India from the government.

The Tata Group originally formed Air India as Tata Air Services in 1932. In 1946 the name was changed to Air India and in 1953 the airline was nationalised.

About AirlineRatings.com
Airlineratings.com was developed to provide everyone in the world a one-stop shop for everything related to airlines, formed by a team of aviation editors, who have forensically researched nearly every airline in the world.

Our rating system is rated from one to seven stars on safety – with seven being the highest ranking. Within each airline, you will find the country of origin, airline code, booking URL and seat map information. The rating system takes into account a number of different factors related to audits from aviation’s governing bodies, lead associations, as well as the airlines, own safety data. Every airline has a safety rating breakdown so you can see exactly how they rate.

Over 230 of the airlines on the site that carry 99 per cent of the world’s passengers have a product rating. Given that low-cost, regional and full-service carriers are so different we have constructed a different rating system for each which can be found within each airline.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

Best of all, there are simple answers to many of the quirky questions including:

“What are all those noises after takeoff and before landing?”
“Why do you have to put the window shades up for landing and takeoff?”
“What is a winglet and what is it for?
“Why is it so costly to fly short distances?”
“How often is an aircraft maintained?
“How strong is a wing?”
“How do they test aircraft”
“How often do plane tyres need to be replaced?

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