Boeing ‘s 2022 Improving Scorecard

20
January 12, 2023
Boeing
PHOTO: United

Boeing has reported 774 commercial orders for last year after cancellations and conversions, including 561 orders for the 737 families and 213 orders for the company’s twin-aisle aircraft.

Boeing delivered 69 commercial jets in December, including 53 737 MAX, bringing the total deliveries for 2022 to 480 aircraft.

Subscribe to the Airlineratings.com newsletter to get the relevant news first

World’s Top Twenty Safest Airlines 2023

NTSB Slams Ethiopian MAX Crash Report

Boeing Commercial Airplanes President and CEO Stan Deal said “we worked hard in 2022 to stabilize 737 production, resume 787 deliveries, launch the 777-8 Freighter and, most importantly, meet our customer commitments.

“As the airline industry expands its recovery, we are seeing strong demand across our product family, particularly the highly efficient 737 MAX and the 787 Dreamliner. We will stay focused on driving stability within our operations and the supply chain as we work to deliver for our customers in 2023 and beyond.”

Commercial orders after cancellations and conversions include:

  • 561 orders for the 737 MAX, adding new customers such as ANA, Delta Air Lines, IAG, and low-cost carrier Arajet.
  • 213 orders for widebodies, including 114 787s, 31 767s and 68 777s
  • 78 orders across Boeing’s freighter line, including 45 orders for the 767-300 Freighter and current 777 Freighter
  • Launching the 777-8 Freighter with more than 50 orders, including conversions

Commercial deliveries include:

  • 387 737s, including 374 737 MAX and 13 military-derivative airplanes
  • 93 widebodies, including 5 747s, 33 767s, 24 777s and 31 787s
  • 44 new production freighters

As of Dec. 31, 2022, the Boeing Commercial Airplanes backlog is 4,578 jets.

About AirlineRatings.com

Airlineratings.com was developed to provide everyone in the world a one-stop shop for everything related to airlines, formed by a team of aviation editors, who have forensically researched nearly every airline in the world.

Our rating system is rated from one to seven stars on safety – with seven being the highest ranking. Within each airline, you will find the country of origin, airline code, booking URL and seat map information. The rating system takes into account a number of different factors related to audits from aviation’s governing bodies, lead associations, as well as the airlines, own safety data. Every airline has a safety rating breakdown so you can see exactly how they rate.

Over 230 of the airlines on the site that carry 99 per cent of the world’s passengers have a product rating. Given that low-cost, regional and full-service carriers are so different we have constructed a different rating system for each which can be found within each airline.

Airlineratings.com has information on over 30 types of aircraft from the latest Boeing 787 to the A380 and smaller jets.

Best of all, there are simple answers to many of the quirky questions including:

  • “What are all those noises after takeoff and before landing?”
  • “Why do you have to put the window shades up for landing and takeoff?”
  • “What is a winglet and what is it for?
  • “Why is it so costly to fly short distances?”
  • “How often is an aircraft maintained?
  • “How strong is a wing?”
  • “How do they test aircraft”
  • “How often do plane tyres need to be replaced?”

2 COMMENTS

  1. I would assume that the 33 orders for 767's would be part of the total of 44 freighters (767 & 777) ordered. Why is the 767 still available, and considered viable, as a freighter and not as a passenger aircraft? Better travel experience, and seat layout, for any journey more than a couple of hours, than the single aisle aircraft that manufacturers are squeezing ever increasing numbers of seats into. Would it be the width of the cargo area that makes it a better freighter than a narrow bodied more modern aircraft?
  2. Agree the seat layout is much better and hopefully the basis for a new passenger plane. The 767 is still in production as a freighter as it is also in production for the USAF as a refuelling tanker.