Airline Ratings - Have Your Say
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Have Your Say

Have Your Say is all about exactly that…having your say. We want to hear your thoughts, tips and suggestions on the airline industry as a whole and answer any question you have for the AirlineRatings.com team.

This section is however, not for sharing your experience with a specific airline - please go to our passenger review section for this. Any ‘Have Your Say’ we receive that is about your experience with a specific airline will not be published.

459 Comments/suggestions

Raymond of Australia

14 Feb 2017

Great site, offering meaningful insight into the airline industry.

One thing which would make it even better is if the "Aircraft" page had some photos of the aircraft with the information.

Editors’ Comment

Look out for our new site coming soon ;-)

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John of Australia

14 Feb 2017

Apologies if this has already been reported but has Emirates explained why it has ceased its A380 service on EK424 Dubai to Perth and replaced it with a Boeing 777? After making a booking on this flight last year on A380 for travel in September 2017 , I noticed that aircraft has changed to Boeing 777 without any communication from Emirates.

Editors’ Comment

It has been downgraded because of poor loads on the morning service.

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Fred of Australia

03 Feb 2017

Hi Geoffrey - this one is technical question - recently looked at a Roo Tales blog about winglets - as a lapsed (communications) engineer I am curious why winglets are not added to the tailplanes and rudder?

Fred

Editors’ Comment

Winglets are added to the wings of existing designs because they increase the effective aspect ratio of a wing without materially increasing the wingspan.

An extension of span would lower lift-induced drag, but would increase parasitic drag and would require boosting the strength and weight of the wing.

They increase the lift generated at the wingtip and reduce the lift-induced drag caused by wingtip vortices, improving lift-to-drag ratio.

However on newer aircraft such as the 777-300ER and 787 designers have gone for a raked wingtip to get the same effect.

Winglets on the horizontal tail and rudder would serve no purpose and just introduce drag.

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David of Australia

31 Jan 2017

Maybe someone can answer this... We (two couples) are looking to book return flights from Adelaide to Europe. We have used Emirates in the past as they fly direct from Adelaide, unlike Qantas. Now Emirates are charging a not insubstantial fee to select seats in advance if we want to ensure we are seated together. If we book through Qantas, who put us code share Emirates flights, do we have to pay this fee or does the normal Qantas seat allocation procedure apply?

Editors’ Comment

You will have to pay with Qantas too unless you have a good frequent flyer status . Check-in and seat selection is free but usually just 24-48 hours before.

CP of Australia

03 Feb 2017

Flight: Perth Dublin. We have been flying with Emirates for some years and were about to again for that flight later this year. However, that seat selection fee on such long-haul flight is a rip off so we will not fly with Emirates, but have switched to Ethihad.

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Vernon of Australia

28 Jan 2017

Your article on the B787 is a complete sales blurb from the Boeing PR department.

Can you, Geoffrey, as an aviation fundi, not find a single deficiency in this aircraft or its development program to remark on ? Possibly compare it to what advantages its rivals have? The Boeing Company, formally very reserved and respected, was very disingenuous over many years regarding this program and its shambolic development.

Can you bear that in mind in future, to please give impartial reporting on Boeing and your recent visit to Washington State ?

Regards

Editors’ Comment

Dear Sir:

Certainly I have been covering the 787 story from way back in 2002 when it was first conceived and in fact broke several of the stories on the delays.

I have written tens of thousands of words about its problems but they are behind it now and itâs time to move on.

In service it is a real winner and this is what we are focusing on today.

Having said that I am writing a book at the moment called the Fall and Rise of the 787 which will go into greater depth on the problems.

Thanks for your interest and I am sorry if it appears that I have glossed over its development problems.

Best Geoffrey Thomas

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David of Australia

27 Jan 2017

You mentioned airlines starting to charge for carry on baggage.

Well why do they now allow passengers with obviously oversized bags or even small suitcases as carry ons, they don't seem to be concerned at the size of these bags even though there is supposed to be strict measurements.

Editors’ Comment

There is definitely inconsistency between the airlines and even the route!

Alan of Australia

30 Jan 2017

Good advert, just a shame you can hardly hear the conversation over the loud and unnecessary music.

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Peter of Australia

21 Jan 2017

I have always had a lot of respect for Geoffrey Thomas and his useful articles, however, continuing the search for MH370, unless someone knows where this wreck is located, is like chasing fairies.

Let me give you my interpretation of this disaster, if the aircraft did a nose dive into the water it would have shredded into a million pieces (evidence the pieces that have been found washed up on the islands), have a look at the germanwings disaster in France ( smashed into tiny bits), this would be the same effect if the aircraft smashed into water, especially from 30,000 feet and at 400 MPH or thereabouts, other evidence is the AirAsia flight in Indonesia.

Basically people are looking for "shredded evidence", bits and pieces.

Editors’ Comment

You are correct but usually, there is some piece that stays in tact better such as a tail or large piece of fuselage. The opinions on continuing the search are very mixed and the reasons for both sides are sound arguments.

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METE of Turkey

15 Jan 2017

Good applications we prefer safety airlines company with your reports

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Luke of Australia

11 Jan 2017

Hello, what has happened to your review of Aeroflot. I notice it is missing?

Editors’ Comment

Yes, it is being updated at the moment and should be back at the end of the week. They score a 6/7 for safety and a 4.5/7 for in-flight product if that's of any help in the meantime.

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Mark of Australia

11 Jan 2017

Hello, do you have the safety rating for Indonesian AirAsia X? IATA code is XT. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indonesia_AirAsia_X.

I believe this airline is different to Indonesia AirAsia (IATA: QZ).

Editors’ Comment

AirAsia X is the long-haul arm of AirAsia and it is registered as a Malaysian airline.You can find all you need to know about AirAsia X here http://www.airlineratings.com/ratings/166/airasia-x

All the AirAsia branches such as AirAsia Thailand, Indonesia, India etc are registered as separate airlines and with that they have different safety ratings.

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Luke of United States

09 Jan 2017

I am an aviation safety expert who has been working extensively with Boeing, the FAA and many airlines on solutions for LOC-I or Loss of Control Incidents which is the leading cause of airline accidents. I completely disagree with your World safest Airlines for 2017 list and consider the article to be misleading and flawed in its conclusions. Myself and my colleagues who include Boeing training pilots would not fly on 5 of your ten top picks because of those airlines inexperienced pilots , reliance on automation and cultural nuances which greatly enhance the likelihood of accidents.

Editors’ Comment

Thanks for your comments. Whilst we stand behind our ratings and the depth of research we go to to come up with our top 20 we are of course always interested in hearing the opinion of other experts in the industry. If you would like to share your thoughts on the five you would not fly and why please email us at support@airlineratings.com

John of Australia

13 Jan 2017

I agree with Luke. Having been involved in the aviation sector for the last 35 years, and flown more than 2500 international flights, it is pilot decisions that count the most when things go wrong. There are airlines I will not use for the reasons given by Luke. However it would be very difficult to determine and rate, in advance, for an external organisation like Airline Ratings, if Pilot training, over reliance on automation and cultural influences would contribute to potential safety issues.

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WILLIAM of Australia

07 Jan 2017

Can anyone pls tell when Emirates will begin placing premium seats on their aircraft....?

Editors’ Comment

They are looking at launching it in mid 2018 at this stage

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Abe of United States

05 Jan 2017

I see that you only rate Airlines from european, american and asian countries excluding airlines from africa always when rating. Are you saying that african airlines are not safe? Here is one example Ethiopian Airlines!!!

Editors’ Comment

Airlines need to score a perfect 7/7 for safety in our standard ratings to be considered in our top 20. Ethiopian scores a 5. Most of the African airlines don't score a 7/7 therefore we can not yet consider them in our top 20 list. For a full understanding of our safety ratings please check here http://www.airlineratings.com/safety_rating_criteria.php

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John of United States

05 Jan 2017

Why is El Al Israel Airlines not mentioned in the 2017 Safest Airlines list?

Editors’ Comment

ElAl along with 140 other airlines scores a perfect 7/7 for safety. In picking our top 20 we look at past incidents, fleet age, cockpit technology and destinations to name a few.

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Borin of Australia

31 Dec 2016

Why do airlines insist in giving prices for international travel excluding baggage,not many people travel OS with 7 kgs carry on.Then the crap you have to go through to add the baggage! Why not include baggage, and then do the baggage removal thing.

Editors’ Comment

Depends what part of the world you live in ;-) over in the US/Europe many many people travel overseas without checked baggage. Granted from Australia the distances are far and the holiday time generally longer, therefore you would take baggage but in the northern hemisphere this is not the case.

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Lutfhie of New Zealand

30 Dec 2016

You gave Germanwings a safety rating of 7 out of 7 (i.e.: a perfect score), but one of the pilots committed suicide on March 24, 2015 that killed all people on board. What was the basis for the perfect score? Do you expect people to believe your rating?

You mentioned "Airlineratings.com does both in flight experience and safety" ..

Editors’ Comment

We don't penalise an airline for an act of human intention such as pilot suicide or terrorism. It is impossible to extensively check the mental health of every pilot every day and obviously if we could identify a terrorist before they boarded a flight we would!. Our safety ratings look at predicting the safety of an airline you might fly with so we look at things that are actually measurable (rather than subjective) such as the airports used, audits passed and previous accidents that are due to pilot, human or maintenance error that by and large could have been prevented.

Mental health is a very complex and individual disease and many go through life undiagnosed. Also we live in a world where privacy is viewed as paramount therefore often a workplace will not know about ones mental heath status if they are diagnosed.

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Robert of Australia

23 Dec 2016

My understanding is that the Qantas flight from Perth to London will be crewed from the UK. Why are Australian governments supporting the initiative if the plane is crewed from the UK?

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Marilyn of Australia

21 Dec 2016

How on earth does Air New Zealand get 7 stars for there product? I had a 6.25 hour flight from Sydney to Rarotonga. That is not a short haul flight. There was no service (unless you had bought the works option). Luggage and any food or refreshments had to be purchased by credit card as did ancient movies (for $10). As my ticket had been purchased through an agent, I was unaware of these extra charges and they were totally unexpected for an International flight of that duration. As the flight crossed the date line, we landed around 6.00am and I was not offered as much as a morning cup of coffee. Air New Zealand, you have joined the ranks of the discount airlines and do not deserve those 7 stars for product.

Editors’ Comment

That's unfortunate that your travel agent was not thorough enough in explaining the options to you.

The reason this airline gets seven stars is that it does offer something for everyone. If you want movies and a meal then you pay the $50 more but if you are trying to save money you have the option to go without these things.

If you hange your mind during the flight then you can buy food and movies on board. The airline gives all its passengers tea, coffee and water as well as seat back entertainment (TV series, music etc) its just the food and movies that you need to pay extra for. This method means everyone can fly in the price bracket they choose on a comfortable airline.

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Don of New Zealand

12 Dec 2016

11 Dec 2016

Airfares to keep falling next year

Consumers are now paying 63 per cent less in real terms than 22 years ago.

You failed to mention that customers are also receiving 63 percent less in comfort, amenities and customer service. Hardly a bargain when you're stuck in a plane with 10-across seating for fifteen hours.

Editors’ Comment

Very true!!!! However, on the flipside, it means now everyone can fly and fly often. Twenty-two years ago there was probably 60 odd per cent of people that couldn't afford to fly more than once every year or two.

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Roger of Australia

12 Dec 2016

It's nice to see that the European Union is concerned about the spiritual well-being of its pilots. Having their "psyche" (soul or spirit) tested is such a lovely idea.

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