Airline Ratings - Have Your Say
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Have Your Say

Have Your Say is all about exactly that…having your say. We want to hear your thoughts, tips and suggestions on the airline industry as a whole and answer any question you have for the AirlineRatings.com team.

This section is however, not for sharing your experience with a specific airline - please go to our passenger review section for this. Any ‘Have Your Say’ we receive that is about your experience with a specific airline will not be published.

474 Comments/suggestions

Alan of Australia

16 Apr 2017

Perth is the most isolated city in the world so all of our flights are long haul paticularly to Europe and North America.

Would it be possible for a comparison table of the seat spacing and the maximum reclining angle of the seat back for each class for all long haul flights? This must be a policy decision of each airline.

This is a significant factor in selecting a long haul flight for maximum comfort particularly in economy.

Editors’ Comment

If you find out what aircraft is flying the particular route you are looking a,t simply check the airline's page on our website and you will be able to see the seat pitch and recline for that aircraft type for each airline

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Geoff of Australia

16 Apr 2017

With the packed and cramped seating configurations on most domestic flights one selling point that would entice me to book on these flights would be for airlines to advertise non reclining seats.

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Patrick of Finland

15 Apr 2017

Your website says Singapore Airlines is fatality free but then there's Singapore Airlines Flight 006 in 2000. Might want to double check all the information you provide so its not misleading.

Editors’ Comment

We look at fatalities in the last 10 years as that's plenty of time for the issues that caused that accident to be well and truly dealt with. Our ratings look at 'predicting' your safety when you fly - an accident from 17 years ago isn't relevant in looking at safety for tomorrow. You can get a full understanding of our safety ratings here http://www.airlineratings.com/safety_rating_criteria.php

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Joan of Australia

09 Apr 2017

When flying with Air Asia how do I find out which one I am flying with ? I booked in Australia to fly Air Asia from Singapore to Ho Chi Min City only to find myself on Air Asia Pacific on an overcrowded plane with no inflight baggage control. The plane seats were falling apart. How do I avoid this situation ?

Editors’ Comment

All AirAsia planes are exactly the same inside in terms of seat type, spacing and number of seats so really you would never notice a difference between them. Sounds like you just got an older plane in the fleet.

Lindsay of Australia

15 Apr 2017

I'm not sure Air Asia flies Singapore-HCMC direct. Did you perhaps mean Jetstar Pacific?

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Edmund of Australia

20 Mar 2017

Editor Sharon's review of Etihad was comprehensive and interesting but one point she made about (among other nationalities) Asian cabin crews not being chatty confirms that she's never flown on Philippine Airlines.

If she had, and approached a crew member with at least a slight smile, she'd often find that the crew - with typically excellent English were only too happy to have a chat. Sharon's comment is true about some Asian nationalities but not about Filipinos.

Editors’ Comment

Hi Edmund, you're right I haven't but from the reviews I read every day and from Filipino friends I'm sure I would agree with you about the crew on Philippine Airlines. When doing a review I always make a point to go up and speak to the crew in the galley when asking for a glass of water and I try to use the call bell at least twice to make sure I get the chance to interact with them - always with a smile and a 'when you have time' !

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Richard of Australia

17 Mar 2017

Your story on the Rex flight ZL768 losing a propellor needs to be changed to 12:05pm not am. Otherwise all good, and glad I wasn't on it as I have flown them before.

Editors’ Comment

Thanks Richard.

Peter of Australia

20 Mar 2017

My understanding is that the cowling of a jet engine is designed to contain the internals if the engine suffers a catastrophic failure, and turbine blades separate from the rotor. My question is whether the fuselage of a propeller driven aeroplane is similarly reinforced in the vicinity of the propellers, or whether there are any other mechanisms present to prevent a propeller blade, or the entire hub in this case, from penetrating the fuselage if failure of the blade or shaft occurs.

Editors’ Comment

The cowling in fact is an aerodynamic shroud for the engine and cannot contain a fan blade or any other part that gets loose from a jet engine.

However, around the engine core itself are various “belts” that will contain a single fan blade.

But the engine “belts” cannot contain a part like a 200kg high pressure turbine disk which itself holds the blades.

The fuselage of the aircraft – both jets and turbo props - is reinforced where it is adjacent to the main front fan blades of a jet engine or the prop off a turbo prop engine.

I hope this explains the situation but please let us know if you need anything further.

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Donna of Australia

10 Mar 2017

I booked a return flight to visit my mother in May 17. My mother has recently passed away so I asked if they could refund my ticket. They said they would charge me nearly $400 for this. I'm too upset to argue with them at the moment as I am grieving. I don't have the strength to argue and it feels like they are kicking me when I am already down. Is this the same for all airlines?

Editors’ Comment

Very sorry to hear of your situation but unfortunately every airline in the world would be the same.A fully refundable ticket will cost you upwards of 500% more than the original ticket so it's often best to buy the cheapest ticket that has no refund or incurs costs to refund the ticket and get a new ticket if you need to change anything. Flying has never been cheaper but with the cheap fares we pay heavy charges for any changes.

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Lindsay of Australia

10 Mar 2017

Does anyone actually know what is happening with the new Batik Air / Lion Air DPS-PER service?

Thanks

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Tony of New Zealand

09 Mar 2017

why do we now get charged for seating when booking flights. This is compulsory now as you cannot proceed with the booking unless you purchase the seat??????????

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Simon of United Kingdom

05 Mar 2017

Are you able to give any indication of Med-View airline's safety record?

Simon

Editors’ Comment

Unfortunately, we don't rate this one at the moment. It would be about a 5/7 though looking at it briefly now.

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William of United Kingdom

03 Mar 2017

Has any other traveller any suggestions as to how to cope with over-size passengers being seated next to you, especially in today's flights that are full to capacity.

Most airlines with long haul flights, do have a clearly defined passenger of size policy but understandably gate staff & cabin crew are unwilling to act upon this policy & tell anyone that they are too large for the seat. They appear to leave it up to the poor adjacent travellers to complain. A task that many travellers do not wish to make for obvious reasons.

Very large travellers are fully aware of their size but continue to book economy seats, knowing they will cause stress & discomfort to others, they won't change.

So although it's the responsibility of the airlines, it's the travelling public who are left to cope with the risk of DVT being made worse or cause a scene. Not a great choice.

How do you manage? Do you accept sharing your seat or do you complain.

Editors’ Comment

Good question!

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Bruce of Australia

02 Mar 2017

Do you have data for the average safety ratings for Low Cost Carriers and Full Service carriers? Preferably listed by major geographical areas eg Europe, Asia, Africa, North America etc?. The base data is in your alphabetical listing of airline safety ratings but its a long task to go through all of these to get the results I am looking for. Thanks and best regards, Bruce R

Editors’ Comment

No we don't do an average on country - we don't really see the benefit of this as different elements of our safety ratings have different weights and therefore it's about what airline scores individually.

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Cesare of Italy

01 Mar 2017

Dears,

what is your opinion about safety of Copa Airlines?

Thanks for your reply.

Cesare.

Editors’ Comment

You can see all about Copa and their safety rating here http://www.airlineratings.com/ratings.php?s&id=47

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Peter of Australia

27 Feb 2017

We all know that Thailand, especially Phuket is a very popular destination with Australians, especially Perth residents. Why is it that no airline has scheduled any "direct flights" between Perth & Phuket? A few years back, both Virgin Australia & Thai Airways were the only airlines that operated these flights, now there are none. Having to stop over in Singapore, Kuala Lumpur or Bangkok is not my idea of a holiday, especially when there are long layovers. I can not understand why this is not available. Can you enlighten me please Geoffrey.

Editors’ Comment

The reason that there is no direct flight is that the aircraft that was being used, the 737-800 is at the very limit of its range even with the reduced payload that was required.

It simply was uneconomical and there is not enough traffic to warrant a larger aircraft.

Another problem is that Bali flights are so, so cheap that airlines are battling to compete with the public’s perception of what a tropical holiday should cost

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Dave of Australia

24 Feb 2017

Morning Geoffrey, I note with interest the review of QF's new premium economy cabin, and the Company's boast that it is at the forefront of the latest technology. Not wishing to be a harbinger of bad tidings, and without actually test driving the product, I feel the VA 777 new P.E. cabin to be ahead in space, and innovations.

Your comments would be appreciated.

Editors’ Comment

That is an interesting point and someone else has pointed out that Air NZ’s PE is better still. So we will shortly do a road or should I say air test on the main PE products and the pricing.

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Raymond of Australia

14 Feb 2017

Great site, offering meaningful insight into the airline industry.

One thing which would make it even better is if the "Aircraft" page had some photos of the aircraft with the information.

Editors’ Comment

Look out for our new site coming soon ;-)

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John of Australia

14 Feb 2017

Apologies if this has already been reported but has Emirates explained why it has ceased its A380 service on EK424 Dubai to Perth and replaced it with a Boeing 777? After making a booking on this flight last year on A380 for travel in September 2017 , I noticed that aircraft has changed to Boeing 777 without any communication from Emirates.

Editors’ Comment

It has been downgraded because of poor loads on the morning service.

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Fred of Australia

03 Feb 2017

Hi Geoffrey - this one is technical question - recently looked at a Roo Tales blog about winglets - as a lapsed (communications) engineer I am curious why winglets are not added to the tailplanes and rudder?

Fred

Editors’ Comment

Winglets are added to the wings of existing designs because they increase the effective aspect ratio of a wing without materially increasing the wingspan.

An extension of span would lower lift-induced drag, but would increase parasitic drag and would require boosting the strength and weight of the wing.

They increase the lift generated at the wingtip and reduce the lift-induced drag caused by wingtip vortices, improving lift-to-drag ratio.

However on newer aircraft such as the 777-300ER and 787 designers have gone for a raked wingtip to get the same effect.

Winglets on the horizontal tail and rudder would serve no purpose and just introduce drag.

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David of Australia

31 Jan 2017

Maybe someone can answer this... We (two couples) are looking to book return flights from Adelaide to Europe. We have used Emirates in the past as they fly direct from Adelaide, unlike Qantas. Now Emirates are charging a not insubstantial fee to select seats in advance if we want to ensure we are seated together. If we book through Qantas, who put us code share Emirates flights, do we have to pay this fee or does the normal Qantas seat allocation procedure apply?

Editors’ Comment

You will have to pay with Qantas too unless you have a good frequent flyer status . Check-in and seat selection is free but usually just 24-48 hours before.

CP of Australia

03 Feb 2017

Flight: Perth Dublin. We have been flying with Emirates for some years and were about to again for that flight later this year. However, that seat selection fee on such long-haul flight is a rip off so we will not fly with Emirates, but have switched to Ethihad.

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Vernon of Australia

28 Jan 2017

Your article on the B787 is a complete sales blurb from the Boeing PR department.

Can you, Geoffrey, as an aviation fundi, not find a single deficiency in this aircraft or its development program to remark on ? Possibly compare it to what advantages its rivals have? The Boeing Company, formally very reserved and respected, was very disingenuous over many years regarding this program and its shambolic development.

Can you bear that in mind in future, to please give impartial reporting on Boeing and your recent visit to Washington State ?

Regards

Editors’ Comment

Dear Sir:

Certainly I have been covering the 787 story from way back in 2002 when it was first conceived and in fact broke several of the stories on the delays.

I have written tens of thousands of words about its problems but they are behind it now and it’s time to move on.

In service it is a real winner and this is what we are focusing on today.

Having said that I am writing a book at the moment called the Fall and Rise of the 787 which will go into greater depth on the problems.

Thanks for your interest and I am sorry if it appears that I have glossed over its development problems.

Best Geoffrey Thomas

Edmund of Australia

15 Mar 2017

The Boeing 789 is hardly a 'winner' for passengers. Nine across seating in Y, which most airlines save for the Japanese have gone for, is uncomfortable and one seat too many, especially given how a majority of Westerners including Australians are now (according to the accepted BMI index) overweight or obese.

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