Airline Ratings - Have Your Say
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Have Your Say

Have Your Say is all about exactly that…having your say. We want to hear your thoughts, tips and suggestions on the airline industry as a whole and answer any question you have for the AirlineRatings.com team.

This section is however, not for sharing your experience with a specific airline - please go to our passenger review section for this. Any ‘Have Your Say’ we receive that is about your experience with a specific airline will not be published.

452 Comments/suggestions

METE of Turkey

15 Jan 2017

Good applications we prefer safety airlines company with your reports

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Luke of Australia

11 Jan 2017

Hello, what has happened to your review of Aeroflot. I notice it is missing?

Editors’ Comment

Yes, it is being updated at the moment and should be back at the end of the week. They score a 6/7 for safety and a 4.5/7 for in-flight product if that's of any help in the meantime.

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Mark of Australia

11 Jan 2017

Hello, do you have the safety rating for Indonesian AirAsia X? IATA code is XT. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indonesia_AirAsia_X.

I believe this airline is different to Indonesia AirAsia (IATA: QZ).

Editors’ Comment

AirAsia X is the long-haul arm of AirAsia and it is registered as a Malaysian airline.You can find all you need to know about AirAsia X here http://www.airlineratings.com/ratings/166/airasia-x

All the AirAsia branches such as AirAsia Thailand, Indonesia, India etc are registered as separate airlines and with that they have different safety ratings.

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Luke of United States

09 Jan 2017

I am an aviation safety expert who has been working extensively with Boeing, the FAA and many airlines on solutions for LOC-I or Loss of Control Incidents which is the leading cause of airline accidents. I completely disagree with your World safest Airlines for 2017 list and consider the article to be misleading and flawed in its conclusions. Myself and my colleagues who include Boeing training pilots would not fly on 5 of your ten top picks because of those airlines inexperienced pilots , reliance on automation and cultural nuances which greatly enhance the likelihood of accidents.

Editors’ Comment

Thanks for your comments. Whilst we stand behind our ratings and the depth of research we go to to come up with our top 20 we are of course always interested in hearing the opinion of other experts in the industry. If you would like to share your thoughts on the five you would not fly and why please email us at support@airlineratings.com

John of Australia

13 Jan 2017

I agree with Luke. Having been involved in the aviation sector for the last 35 years, and flown more than 2500 international flights, it is pilot decisions that count the most when things go wrong. There are airlines I will not use for the reasons given by Luke. However it would be very difficult to determine and rate, in advance, for an external organisation like Airline Ratings, if Pilot training, over reliance on automation and cultural influences would contribute to potential safety issues.

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WILLIAM of Australia

07 Jan 2017

Can anyone pls tell when Emirates will begin placing premium seats on their aircraft....?

Editors’ Comment

They are looking at launching it in mid 2018 at this stage

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Abe of United States

05 Jan 2017

I see that you only rate Airlines from european, american and asian countries excluding airlines from africa always when rating. Are you saying that african airlines are not safe? Here is one example Ethiopian Airlines!!!

Editors’ Comment

Airlines need to score a perfect 7/7 for safety in our standard ratings to be considered in our top 20. Ethiopian scores a 5. Most of the African airlines don't score a 7/7 therefore we can not yet consider them in our top 20 list. For a full understanding of our safety ratings please check here http://www.airlineratings.com/safety_rating_criteria.php

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John of United States

05 Jan 2017

Why is El Al Israel Airlines not mentioned in the 2017 Safest Airlines list?

Editors’ Comment

ElAl along with 140 other airlines scores a perfect 7/7 for safety. In picking our top 20 we look at past incidents, fleet age, cockpit technology and destinations to name a few.

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Borin of Australia

31 Dec 2016

Why do airlines insist in giving prices for international travel excluding baggage,not many people travel OS with 7 kgs carry on.Then the crap you have to go through to add the baggage! Why not include baggage, and then do the baggage removal thing.

Editors’ Comment

Depends what part of the world you live in ;-) over in the US/Europe many many people travel overseas without checked baggage. Granted from Australia the distances are far and the holiday time generally longer, therefore you would take baggage but in the northern hemisphere this is not the case.

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Lutfhie of New Zealand

30 Dec 2016

You gave Germanwings a safety rating of 7 out of 7 (i.e.: a perfect score), but one of the pilots committed suicide on March 24, 2015 that killed all people on board. What was the basis for the perfect score? Do you expect people to believe your rating?

You mentioned "Airlineratings.com does both in flight experience and safety" ..

Editors’ Comment

We don't penalise an airline for an act of human intention such as pilot suicide or terrorism. It is impossible to extensively check the mental health of every pilot every day and obviously if we could identify a terrorist before they boarded a flight we would!. Our safety ratings look at predicting the safety of an airline you might fly with so we look at things that are actually measurable (rather than subjective) such as the airports used, audits passed and previous accidents that are due to pilot, human or maintenance error that by and large could have been prevented.

Mental health is a very complex and individual disease and many go through life undiagnosed. Also we live in a world where privacy is viewed as paramount therefore often a workplace will not know about ones mental heath status if they are diagnosed.

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Robert of Australia

23 Dec 2016

My understanding is that the Qantas flight from Perth to London will be crewed from the UK. Why are Australian governments supporting the initiative if the plane is crewed from the UK?

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Marilyn of Australia

21 Dec 2016

How on earth does Air New Zealand get 7 stars for there product? I had a 6.25 hour flight from Sydney to Rarotonga. That is not a short haul flight. There was no service (unless you had bought the works option). Luggage and any food or refreshments had to be purchased by credit card as did ancient movies (for $10). As my ticket had been purchased through an agent, I was unaware of these extra charges and they were totally unexpected for an International flight of that duration. As the flight crossed the date line, we landed around 6.00am and I was not offered as much as a morning cup of coffee. Air New Zealand, you have joined the ranks of the discount airlines and do not deserve those 7 stars for product.

Editors’ Comment

That's unfortunate that your travel agent was not thorough enough in explaining the options to you.

The reason this airline gets seven stars is that it does offer something for everyone. If you want movies and a meal then you pay the $50 more but if you are trying to save money you have the option to go without these things.

If you hange your mind during the flight then you can buy food and movies on board. The airline gives all its passengers tea, coffee and water as well as seat back entertainment (TV series, music etc) its just the food and movies that you need to pay extra for. This method means everyone can fly in the price bracket they choose on a comfortable airline.

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Don of New Zealand

12 Dec 2016

11 Dec 2016

Airfares to keep falling next year

Consumers are now paying 63 per cent less in real terms than 22 years ago.

You failed to mention that customers are also receiving 63 percent less in comfort, amenities and customer service. Hardly a bargain when you're stuck in a plane with 10-across seating for fifteen hours.

Editors’ Comment

Very true!!!! However, on the flipside, it means now everyone can fly and fly often. Twenty-two years ago there was probably 60 odd per cent of people that couldn't afford to fly more than once every year or two.

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Roger of Australia

12 Dec 2016

It's nice to see that the European Union is concerned about the spiritual well-being of its pilots. Having their "psyche" (soul or spirit) tested is such a lovely idea.

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Lindsay of Australia

11 Dec 2016

I think it is about time that airlines police the seat belt being on when the seat belt sign is activated. I have flown extensively over many years and have unfortunately experienced a situation when an aircraft did not stop at an air bridge and many intolerant passengers went flying when they stood up to unload their bags before the set belt sign was extinguished. Of course this was in the USA but have witnessed similar all around the world But read litigation and damages.

Current technology can detect that a seat is occupied and a seat belt is activated (my car has it and it is a cheap low market model). This is not hard to police.

Similarly those that undo their seat belts who are impacted by turbulence should be excluded from claiming damages. It is their problem and not the airlines or the insurance company.

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David of Australia

11 Dec 2016

So we finally the the announcement for the Qantas nonstop Perth to London flights. Any potential low fuel problems on the outbound flights are easily resolved as there are any number of alternate landing places available. But what happens on the return to Perth if that airport is closed shortly before the B787 is due to land? What alternates are available? Adelaide is a long way away. Could Kalgoorlie accomodate a 787?

Editors’ Comment

Perth airport is virtually always open. Even when there are no passenger flights there are still cargo and postal services using the airport.

Alternate airports include Exmouth and Adelaide. International flights need to go to an airport that is equipped with customs facilities unless of course, it is a mayday in which case an aircraft can land at any airport close by.

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Guillermo of Mexico

07 Dec 2016

I don't understand why PIA is 7 stars safety rated. At least I am aware of two fatal crashes in the last years and I have read a lot of documents and articles warning the dangerous that airline is. I used to consult this webpage before booking any flight, especially on Africa and Asia. But I am not sure if I can trust your raitings anymore.

Editors’ Comment

PIA is no longer rates 7 stars after the accident yesterday. It is now 6-star safety rated and may go down further.

You can get a full understanding of how we allocate the seven stars for safety here http://www.airlineratings.com/safety_rating_criteria.php

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Grant of Australia

12 Nov 2016

B777's all over getting the 10 across seating in Economy but you're still paying the 'full service' cost of the ticket. Was sandwiched into one of these narrow seats recently on Qatar Doha > Perth for 10+ hours. Will look NOT to fly Airlines using 777's on route I'm planning to fly. If they are going to jam me in I might as well just buy a ticket for half the price and fly Budget / LCC for half the price on a A320 / B737 - or look for a B787 option

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Bill of United Kingdom

11 Nov 2016

Re BA adding so many extra seats to economy. As my wife & I are not either tall or wide travellers, this will have a limited effect on us.

However, as the seats will be smaller but travellers by & large are bigger, BA really need to enforce their Person of Size policy. At present airlines appear happy to leave this up to travellers to sort out, which is outrageous. I have been squashed for hours by a huge traveller, it is a situation airlines MUST address. POS travellers must be made to pay for larger seats & must NEVER simply occupy part of another's seating.

Stephen of Australia

27 Nov 2016

Couldn't agree more! See my post 27/10/2016. Thats why my absolute favourite plane to fly in is the Airbus A330. The vast majority of these are 2/4/2 in economy, so when flying as a couple get a set of 2 by the window and there is no issue with other passengers imposing on your space, which you have paid for.

Editors’ Comment

The A330 would have to be arguably the best cabin layout for economy passengers

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Edmund of Australia

10 Nov 2016

Sharon Petersen's review of AirAsiaX was outstanding, despite a spelling error or two.

A surprising number of Australians - although diminishing - are first time flyers or new to low cost carriers so her tips such as 'carry an empty water bottle thorugh security to avoid paying through the nose on board', while obvious to those of us fortunate enough to have travelled many times overseas, are handy to new travellers.

It is a disgrace that some airlines do not provide potable drinking water for free on board. Railways in Australia such as V/Line, NSWTrainLink and QR do on all country trains, many of which are for journeys shorter in duration than any AirAsiaX flight out of Australia.

I realise that some of the Airline Ratings' staff are based in Perth but it would be great if in time they could eventually review Philippine Airlines (which now flies from manila to Brisbane via Darwin, Cairns, Melbourne and Sydney as well as Cairns - Auckland) and Cebu Pacific (manila - Sydney). Philippines is one of the fastest growing tourism destinations in southeast Asia and despite being almost totally ignored by group tours has a lot of independent travellers visiting it for the beaches and great typical southeast Asian lifestyle, once one escapes from chaotic larger cities.

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Roger of Australia

01 Nov 2016

Banning Hand Baggage to Improve Evacuation of Aircraft in Emergencies

When I was regular traveller on the British Airways shuttle from London, Heathrow to Belfast in the early 1980s during what was euphemistically known as 'The Trouble', for a period no hand baggage of any sort was permitted on the flights. Even women had to check their handbags. Unless I was staying overnight I just took a couple of meeting papers in an open manila folder. Nobody complained and the system worked very well. Of course, this was before the age of pocketable mobile phones, laptops and tablets. Even though bombs were going off in London from time to time and much more regularly in Northern Ireland, apart from the ban on hand baggage security was nothing like as obtrusive as it is today. I am not aware of any incident involving flights in and out of Belfast during this period. Given the continued failure rate by airport screeners in detecting dangerous items that was recently reported perhaps there is a need to re-appraise the current approach.

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